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The verdict is in: all the dietary, exercise, and longevity science is converging on a holistic lifestyle recommendation for health, vigor, and anti-aging youthfulness.

Lift weights

Weight lifting better for heart health than running

Scientists looking at the health records of more than 4,000 people have concluded that, while both forms of exercise reduce the risk of developing heart disease, static activities such as weight lifting or press-ups have a greater effect than an equivalent amount of dynamic exercise such as running, walking or cycling.

The research challenges commonly held assumption that so-called “cardiovascular” pursuits like running are of greatest benefit to the heart.

However, it backs up previous studies which suggest that heavy static exercise gives the circulatory system a better workout because the oxygen expenditure is more intense.

Replace Carbs with Fat

How a Low-Carb Diet Might Help You Maintain a Healthy Weight

Adults who cut carbohydrates from their diets and replaced them with fat sharply increased their metabolisms.

…a large new study published on Wednesday in the journal BMJ challenges the conventional wisdom. It found that overweight adults who cut carbohydrates from their diets and replaced them with fat sharply increased their metabolisms. After five months on the diet, their bodies burned roughly 250 calories more per day than people who ate a high-carb, low-fat diet, suggesting that restricting carb intake could help people maintain their weight loss more easily.

Fast at least 16 hours each day, or 20-24 hours twice per week

Can the science of autophagy boost your health?

…fasting does stimulate autophagy [ed: cell cleaning], he said, and its benefits had also been proven by other studies.

Autophagy was first discovered in the 1960s, but its fundamental importance was only recognised after Yoshinori Ohsumi’s research in the 1990s.

“What we’ve discovered is that it protects against diseases like Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and certain forms of dementia,” said Dr Rubinsztein.

“It also seems to be beneficial in the context of infection control, as well as protecting against excessive inflammation.”

Let’s count off the limpwrists and soylibs BTFO by this information.

Blotchy-skinned vegetarians: your pasta and cereal filler food negates any healthful impact from eating leafy greens. Judgment rendered: BTFO

Skinnyfat marathon runners: Your heart health, and not to mention your aesthetics, would be better if you hit the weight room instead of the pavement. Judgment rendered: BTFO

Big Pharma: We don’t need your drugs. All we need is to intermittently push away from the table. Judgment rendered: BTFO

It’s Mangan’s world, we’re just living in it.

PS Steve Sailer on the latest diet study.

PPS This is interesting, and funny: “What a week of groceries looks like around the world“. I see a lot of crappy packaged foods in the US and UK, and fresh fruits and veggies everywhere else. Mongolians are big meat eaters. Mexifats love soda. Germans love beer. Italians love bread. And those aren’t Canadians. Or Australians. (And is it really that difficult to find a White family in America?)

PPPS Rogue Health & Fitness is a great website for quickly getting up to speed on the latest science in health and longevity. Mangan to his credit has been on top of this stuff for a while, and the legacy media is only now catching up. The proof is in the photo. Check the front page for a pic of Mangan. This post is particularly interesting — The Rise and Fall of Heart Attacks — because it explores reasons why the US heart attack rate peaked in 1970 and dropped precipitously by 2010 to levels not seen since 1910 (a trend most people are unaware of).

Dr. David Grimes wrote: “Few people are aware that coronary heart disease (CHD) has been an epidemic of the latter half of the 20th century. It is now almost over.” […]

Three Factors: Cigarettes, Hydrogenated Seed Oils, and Sugar

To see what factors may have caused the rise in heart disease, we should ask what factors were low to non-existent in 1900, and that are known to cause heart disease, which then increased in the course of the century.

***

Annual per capita cigarette consumption in the U.S. in 1900 was 54 cigarettes. (Source.) Machine-manufacturing caused the price of cigarettes to drop, and per capita consumption rose dramatically to over 4000 by 1965, and currently stands at about 1000. Less than 5% of Americans smoked cigarettes in 1900, while 42% were smokers in 1965. […]

The culprit is not nicotine, but the chemical stew of thousands of toxic chemicals that forms when tobacco is ignited.

***

Besides hydrogenated seed oils, regular liquid seed oil use became commonplace in the 20th century. Soybean oil use per capita rose more than 1000-fold from 1900 to 1999. Use of vegetable (seed) oils raises the risk of heart disease.

***

Sugar consumption rose greatly in the 20th century. Sugar is associated with coronary heart disease.

My candidates for the cause of its rise are cigarettes, seed oils, and sugar.

Meat didn’t have anything to do with it.

What’s notable is that the decline in deaths from heart attacks which began around 1970 coincided with the *increase* in obesity. Cigarettes suppress appetite, so the decline in smoking may have promoted a rise in the obesity rate. Sugar consumption has continued to increase right up until the present, so that likely played a role in the obesity pandemic as well. And finally, SOY. Soybean oil consumption really took off about the same time as the obesity crisis.

Why weren’t there many fat Americans in the early part of the 20th Century? Smoking was almost nonexistent then, so appetite suppression caused by cigarette use can’t explain it. Hydrogenated seed oil wasn’t introduced until 1911, so that seems a likelier cause of the increase in overweight Americans as mid-century approached. Sugar consumption has been rising since 1840 but really took off after 1880. That could be a culprit. But my guess is that Americans were thinner a hundred years ago because we a.) didn’t eat as much b.) moved our bodies a lot more c.) ate good fats and unrefined, high fiber carbs and d.) weren’t drinking water teeming with endocrine disruptors.

PPPPS Here is a map showing the geographic outlines of a future New America:

Off-topic? Only if you’re a small picture pleb.

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